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During the Irish Revolution, the nationalist activism of adolescents was often channelled through the conduit of uniformed youth groups such as Na Fianna Éireann, the Clan na Gael Girl Scouts and the Scout Corps of the Irish Citizen Army. In this podcast Marnie Hay provides an introduction to these youth groups and highlights some examples of the potentially perilous activities undertaken by adolescents during the years 1916-23 and the serious consequences these teenage activists faced.

Marnie Hay

DCU School of History and Geography

The perils of adolescent activism during the Irish Revolution

‘The perils of adolescent activism during the Irish Revolution’, a podcast by Dr Marnie Hay, DCU School of History and Geography.

During the Irish Revolution, the nationalist activism of adolescents was often channelled through the conduit of uniformed youth groups such as Na Fianna Éireann, the Clan na Gael Girl Scouts and the Scout Corps of the Irish Citizen Army. In this podcast Marnie Hay provides an introduction to these youth groups and highlights some examples of the potentially perilous activities undertaken by adolescents during the years 1916-23 and the serious consequences these teenage activists faced.

Marnie Hay’s most recent book, Na Fianna Éireann and the Irish Revolution, 1909-23: Scouting for Rebels (Manchester UP), is now available in paperback. A lecturer in history at Dublin City University, she is also the author of Bulmer Hobson and the Nationalist Movement in Twentieth-Century Ireland (Manchester UP).

Podcast

How to listen

The perils of adolescent activism during the Irish Revolution by Marnie Hay. The podcast is available on Apple, Spotify, Soundcloud and via RSS Feed.

Image: Fianna Éireann Council, between 1912–1915. Front row (left to right) Patrick Holohan, Michael Lonergan and Con Colbert. Back row (left to right) Garry Holohan and Padraig Ryan. Source: National Library of Ireland on The Commons, No restrictions, via Wikimedia Commons

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