George FitzGerald, 16th Earl of Kildare

Podcasts from the Tudor and Stuart Ireland Conference 2014

As in previous years, the 2014 programme was a testament to the dynamism of current research on early modern Ireland. Over thirty speakers presented papers on the political, civic, ecclesiastical/religious, literary, medical, and material world of Ireland during the Tudor and Stuart periods.

The fourth Tudor and Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference took place at the Iontas Building, NUI Maynooth, from Friday, 29 August, to Saturday, 30 August, 2014. As in previous years, the 2014 programme was a testament to the dynamism of current research on early modern Ireland. Over thirty speakers presented papers on the political, civic, ecclesiastical/religious, literary, medical, and material world of Ireland during the Tudor and Stuart periods. Among these, papers on the origins of the Stuart post office, women and society, Jacobite propaganda, Plantation Ulster, and warfare offered unique glimpses into Ireland’s early modern past. As in 2011 and 2012, the majority of conference papers were recorded for podcast by Real Smart Media, including the opening plenary by Professor Alan Ford (University of Nottingham) – ‘“Love God and hate the pope”: (un)changing Protestant attitudes towards Catholicism 1600-2000’ – and the closing plenary by Professor John McCafferty (UCD) – ‘A single witness: Ireland and Europe through the eyes of a small man with a big nose’. Paper/podcast abstracts and the programme are available on the conference website: www.tudorstuartireland.com.

Whether you attended the 2014 conference and are tuning-in to listen again or you are listening for the first time, we hope that you enjoy these latest additions to the Tudor and Stuart Ireland podcast series. In total, there have been over 37,000 downloads/plays of podcasts from the 2011, 2012, and 2014 conferences to date!

Podcasts from the 2014 conference:

With 2015 just around the corner, preparations are already underway for the fifth Tudor and Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference, which will be held at Maynooth University on 28-29 August 2015. If you enjoyed podcasts from past conferences, we hope you will join us in 2015 for what promises to be another year of exciting research presented in a genuinely collegial atmosphere. All are welcome to attend. Please visit the conference website for ongoing updates, to contact the conference organisers, or join our mailing list.

The Fourth Tudor and Stuart Interdisciplinary Conference was generously supported by UCD School of History and Archives; UCD Research; Marsh’s Library; Graduate Studies, NUI Maynooth; and the Department of History, NUI Maynooth. The papers were recorded for podcast by Real Smart Media for History Hub.

Jeffrey Cox (Communications Officer)


List of podcasts from the Tudor and Stuart Ireland Conference 2014

Plenaries:

Professor Alan Ford (Nottingham) – ‘Love God and hate the Pope’: (un)changing Protestant attitudes towards Catholicism 1600-2000.

Professor John McCafferty (UCD) - A single witness: Ireland and Europe through the eyes of a small man with a big nose.

Papers:

Simon Egan (University College Cork) - The MacSweny lordship of Fanad in the later fifteenth century.

Janet McGrory (University of Ulster) - Sir Arthur Chichester; an Elizabethan planter in a Stuart kingdom.

Dearbháile McCloskey Hutchinson (University of Ulster) - Tristram Beresford and the plantation of Ulster.

Jessica Cunningham (NUI Maynooth) - ‘the fashion and price I will wait upon your lordship for direction’: the acquisition of domestic silver in early-seventeenth century Ireland.

Prof. Colm Lennon (Professor Emeritus, NUI Maynooth) - Protestant-Catholic relations in seventeenth century Ireland: a case study of St Audoen’s parish, Dublin.

Dr James O’Neill - Speedy swords? Violence and restraint during the Nine Years War, 1593-1603.

Prof. Raymond Pierre Hylton (Virginia Union University) and Dr Marie Leoutre (National Library of Ireland) - Exile to integration: Dublin as a paradigm for the Huguenots experience in Ireland.

Frances Nolan University College Dublin - The ‘Jacobite woman’: female ‘outlaws’ after the Williamite-Jacobite war.

Prof. Raymond Gillespie (NUI, Maynooth) - For the honour of the city: The town hall in early modern Ireland.

Anthony Hughes (NUI, Maynooth) – The Stuart post office in Ireland: not just for delivering letters.

Dr John Cunningham (Trinity College Dublin / University of Exeter) - The medical world of early modern Ireland.

J. Stuart Keogh (University of Dundee) - French silver, Jacobite pen? Propaganda from Dublin, 1689-90.

Joe Lines (Queen’s University Belfast) - Irish nationality in the criminal biography, 1660-1700

Damian Duffy (NUI, Maynooth) - ‘ …a lady of suche port, that all estates of the realme crouched unto her’: Margaret Fitzgerald, countess of Ormond.

Dr Tadhg Ó hAnnracháin (University College Dublin) - Early modern Catholicism in the northern Netherlands, England and Ireland: some points of comparison and contrast.

Dr Áine Hensey –  ‘…compelled to subsist on herbs and water’: The prisoner priests of Bofin and Inis Mór, 1657-62.

Mr Martin Foerster (University of Hamburg) - So poor but yet so rich: Jesuit finances in Restoration Ireland.

James Sheridan (Trinity College Dublin) - An elusive settlement: the negotiations of Lord Deputy Sir Henry Sidney and Turlough Luineach O’Neill, 1575-1579.

Dr Karen Holland  (Providence College) - Insuring the quiet of the country: Elizabeth I and Joan Fitzgerald, Countess of Desmond.

Declan Mills (University of Limerick) - Elizabethan Ireland: the graveyard of ambition or land of political opportunity.

Dr John Jeremiah Cronin - The Irish Battlefields Project’s survey of the battle sites of the Confederate Wars: an illustrative analysis of four battlefields.

Dr Ciska Neyts (Hertford College, Oxford University) - Continental influences on confederate warfare (1641-9)

Jennifer Wells (Brown University/Institute of Historical Research) - ‘Spanish wine bee better than French’: Continental Realpolitik and its imperial resonance, 1649-92.

Dr David Heffernan (University College Cork) - Political discourse in early sixteenth century Ireland, c. 1515-1558: A re-evaluation.

Dr Mark Hutchinson (University of Göttingen) - Inverting Resistance Theory and the state in Elizabethan Ireland.

Jeffrey Cox (University College Dublin) - If you build it, will they come? Parish churches, the state and religious change,c. 1560-1630: a case study of County Kildare.

Image: detail from portrait of George FitzGerald, 16th Earl of Kildare (unknown artist, private collection, 1633).